Internet Blowhards

Pearls-Before-Swine-emily-Guskin

From Twitter

Like most folks addicted to the Internet, I get a large percentage of my contemporary news from that medium, reading totally from reputable sources like major-newspaper or published-magazine Websites, not your everyday blogger and far-left- or far-right-leaning sites whose twisted versions of the actual facts are taken out of original context to serve the writer’s own prejudice views, containing stories that can be classified as fake news.

Seems like politicians throw around that illustrious term whenever bad press is about them, and their minions believe it, passing on the same expression in their postings on Social Media, or in comments at the end of various articles. Their cantankerous spewing is like listening to an original tape recording of their political poo-bah.

Everyone has a right to their opinions, but what raises my ire is reading some of the comments made, posted by smart-aleck trolls who slant everything into a political rant, regardless of the subject matter.

It’s liberal this, conservative that; who gives a shit about political leanings when reading about astrophysics, space exploration, medical breakthroughs, philosophical merriment, whatever?

Then there are those who spew hatred in all of their responses, whether it’s bigotry, racism, xenophobia, misogyny, homophobia, etc. Prior to the Internet, such trolling was not widely prevalent as it is today, which brings up Stephan Pastis’ cartoon displayed at the top of this essay.

Found it on my Twitter feed earlier, re-posted by the cartoonist, originally tweeted by Emily Guskin, a writer for the Washington Post. The spoof illustrates a good point: the anonymity of the Internet does bring the worst out in people. I bet the trolls who post all that vitriol are like timid animals in real life: harmless lambs, sheep following their flock.

This .GIF found on the Web exemplifies these blowhards:

dogs

I’m so sick and tired of reading political rants and raves, and yet here I am posting about them in my weekly diatribe. It’s horrendous the way everyday conversations lead to someone’s political leanings, preached while standing upon their own Social Media soapboxes or platforms.

March sure did come in like a lion on the East Coast with Winter Storm Riley, a nor’easter that turned into a bomb cyclone. That’s another thing that cracks me up: how every storm now has a name, like hurricanes did only in the past. And whoever heard of bomb cyclones before? Seems like the expression is new to our vocabulary.

I doubt we’re going to use up every letter of the alphabet during this winter season with storm names. March should go out like a lamb, according to the old saying, but hopefully not a political one as aforementioned.

Spring is less than three weeks away. Major League Baseball season starts on Thursday, March 29th, which is the official start of spring for this fan. Bring it on! I’m ready for it.

I need to get back to recording some covers again. Who cares if no one likes them? In lieu of something new, allow me to post this old-time favorite, recorded with my good friend, Rie Waits, who, incidentally, is celebrating her birthday on Friday.

Happy birthday, Rie.

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About Mike Slickster

As an early retiree with an honorary doctorate degree from the proverbial "School of Hard Knocks," this upcoming author with a lot of free time on his hands utilizes his expansive repertoire for humorous yet tragic, wildly creative writing that contains years of imaginative fantasy, pure nonsense, classic slapstick, extreme happiness and searing heartbreak; gathered by a wealth of personal experiences throughout his thrilling—sometimes mundane or unusually horrid—free-spirited, rock-'n'-roller-coaster ride around our beloved Planet Earth. Mike Slickster's illustrious quest continues, living now in Act Three of his present incarnation, quite a bit on the cutting edge of profundity and philosophical merriment as seen through his colorful characters, most notably evident in the amusing Thirty Days Across the Big Pond series, all of which can be found at Lulu.com.
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